Why Researching Your Ancestor’s FAN Club is Important

I am on spring break, people!  Oh my goodness, it feels so good to get back to researching the ancestors.  I don’t seem to get a lot of time to research or blog these days because my little first graders keep me incredibly busy these days.  I love being a teacher but I definitely miss the research time.

But now that spring break is here, I have been researching like crazy!  I seem to have two different research projects going on but both boil down to one thing: researching and documenting my ancestor’s FAN club.

Left to Right: Joseph Gratzer, Grace (Frank) Palmer, Nancy Jean Rogers (my grandmother), and John N. Morris (my 2x-great grandfather).  This photo was likely taken in the Seattle or Tacoma, Washington area.  These people are all extended family of my grandmother, an only child.  Researching these people led me to a distant cousin with all of these photos - and now they belong to me!

Left to Right: Joseph Gratzer, Grace (Frank) Palmer, Nancy Jean Rogers (my grandmother), and John N. Morris (my 2x-great grandfather). This photo was likely taken in the Seattle or Tacoma, Washington area. These people are all extended family of my grandmother, an only child. Researching these people led me to a distant cousin with all of these photos – and now they belong to me!

FAN stands for friends, associates, and neighbors – pretty much the people in your ancestor’s lives.  So often we get suck thinking of our ancestors are islands in history – but the truth is, they interacted with all sorts of people.  Researching those FANs might shed new light on an ancestor or give you the missing piece to break through a brick wall.

Right now, my focus as been on documenting two specific families: My Harney line is a brick wall with my immigrant ancestor – although I have lots of documents for his life in the U.S., I have been stuck with his life in Germany.  My hope is that by doing more FAN research, I can narrow down more information about him and find him in Germany and extend that line back further.  My Dugger line is a bit of a mess when it gets back to my 5x-great grandparents, John Dugger and Mary Engle.  Together, they had 20 kids.  While many people have researched this line, there is so much junk out there about this family.  My goal is to break through some brick walls and find more solid evidence by researching the FAN club.

I’ve broken through brick walls by researching the FAN club.  With enough research on my ancestor and their FAN club, maybe I will break through another one.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!
Share

One response to “Why Researching Your Ancestor’s FAN Club is Important

  1. Great advice and great results! Congratulations. Looking forward to seeing the new finds and new connections you make.
    Marian Wood´s last blog post ..Sunday’s Obituary: James Freeland, Deputy Sheriff (and Life-Long Democrat)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

CommentLuv badge