Monthly Archives: January 2014

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: John E. Asher

Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small blog has created an interesting challenge to write about one ancestor each week for the entire year.  The challenge is called 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks and you can read all about it here.

This week’s ancestor is John E. Asher, my 3x-great grandfather.  Most of what I know about John Asher is from later in his life.  Having to write this blog post has actually added a long to-do list of resources to check but I’ll get to that later.

John Asher died sometime before June 1855.  On 4 Jun 1855, his wife, Louisa Asher, was made the Administratix of his estate.

 

On 4 Jun 1855, Louisa Asher was made the Administratix of John Asher's Estate.

On 4 Jun 1855, Louisa Asher was made the Administratix of John Asher.
(Source: “Tennessee, Probate Court Books, 1795-1927,” digital images, FamilySearch, FamilySearch (www.FamilySearch.org : accessed 18 July 2013), entry for the Letters of Administration to Louisa Asher on the estate of John Asher, deceased. Johnson County, Wills 1836-1872, Vol 1, Image 66, Pg 98.)

John Asher is listed on the 1850 Census in Civil District 5, Johnson County, Tennessee and he is also listed on agricultural census for the same year.

He is also listen on the 1840 Census in Civil District 5, Johnson County, Tennessee.

But that’s where the trail stops.  Where and when did he get married?  Who are his parents?  Siblings?  What about his birth date?  There are a lot of unanswered questions.

It seems the rest of my research for John Asher will have to come from traditional not-yet-on-the-internet sources like early tax lists, Bible records, and land records.  These will help me narrow down when he came to Johnson County (or answer if he was born here) and possibly answer the parent and sibling questions.

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SNGF: What’s My Ancestor Score?

Every Saturday, Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings challenges us to a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun challenge.  Although it is now Monday and I am late to the party, this week’s challenge was just too much fun to pass up: What Is Your Ancestor Score?  In this challenge, you calculate how complete your genealogy is based on 10 generations, create a chart for those generations, and find our score.

I filled in the below chart by creating an Ahnentafel chart in RootsMagic and counted up each the people in each generation.

Generation Relationship Possible People Identified People
1 Me 1 1
2 Parents 2 2
3 Grandparents 4 4
4 Great Grandparents 8 8
5 2x Great Grandparents 16 16
6 3x Great Grandparents 32 29
7 4x Great Grandparents 64 49
8 5x Great Grandparents 128 69
9 6x Great Grandparents 256 51
10 7x Great Grandparents 510 5
Totals: 1,023 234

I have identified 234 ancestors out of 1,023 possible ancestors.  My ancestor score is 23%.  Let’s see if I can raise that in 2014!  Thanks for the fun challenge, Randy!

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52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Peter Potter

Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small blog has created an interesting challenge to write about one ancestor each week for the entire year.  The challenge is called 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks and you can read all about it here.  I’ve decided that even with my busy schedule, I am going to accept this challenge.

The first week’s ancestor will be Peter Potter.  Why?  Because I don’t know if Peter Potter picked a peck of pickled peppers.  [Go ahead and laugh, you know you want to]

Peter Potter is my 4x-great grandfather.  He was born around 1800 in Tennessee and I have yet to prove his parents although my guess is that his parents were John M. Potter and Mary/Molly Stout.

On 2 June 1821 he married Martha “Patsy” Bunton in Carter County Tennessee.   Here is his marriage record:

Peter Potter Marriage Record

Source: Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1850, , Peter Potter & Patsy Bunton, 2 June 1821; FamilySearch.org

Peter lived the rest of his life in Carter County, Tennessee.  With his wife Martha “Patsy” Bunton, he had the following children: Sarah Ellen Potter (my 3rd great grandmother), Peter H. Potter, Mary Ann Potter, Naomi Potter, Noah J. Potter, Martha C. Potter, and Mercy S.R. Potter.

After the death of his wife, Martha, Peter married Lousana Shell on 10 Oct 1870 in Carter County, Tennessee.  With Lousana, he then had Alice R. Potter, David E. Potter, and Daniel S. Potter.

I have been unable to tract down Peter’s exact date of death, although I know it was after 1880 and before 1900.

Are we related?  Drop me an email.

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2014 – The Year Genealogy Becomes Fun Again

There has been some talk lately in the genealogy blogosphere about how all the definitions and methodologies and good research practices can bog down a researcher – and I totally agree. If you aren’t careful, you can quickly become obsessed with all the definitions and proof arguments and lose all the fun of discovering the stories of your ancestors.

2014 The Year Genealogy Becomes Fun

Let me be clear here: I’m not saying you shouldn’t always strive to make your research the best it can be, because you should always be doing that. You should always be learning and growing and experimenting when it comes to your research. But you shouldn’t obsess over all of that so much that you forget the rush you felt on your all night research binges.

Remember the all night genealogy research binge rush? You got your favorite beverage by your side and you start opening browser window after browser window, going from Ancestry.com to FamilySearch to Fold3 and Google Books and downloading documents left and right. Your eyelids start getting heavy around 2 a.m. but you keep going, insistent on figuring out who great-great grandpa’s fourth wife’s maiden name was. And you know you are so close, right on the edge of finding it. And then you get that magical moment where you find it and you cheer, lifting your arms in the air with pride cause you did it. And then you look over at the clock and realize it is 5 a.m. and you gotta get up for work in two hours. So you go to bed, wake up feeling like something the cat dragged in, and down coffee the rest of the day until you are free to do it all over again.

Now I’m not saying all of your research should be late night binges where you download things willy-nilly and half way enter the source citation into your database program. But you should enjoy that binge every once in a while. You should enjoy that rush that comes with discovering your ancestors through the records they left behind. But at the same time, you should also regularly take a step back to re-evaluate the research you’ve done – is there something you’ve overlooked, a different way of seeing things, a new record type to discover, or a new research trick you can try?

While I spent much of 2013 trying to learn as much as I could about proper research methods, in 2014 I will learn to find a balance between the fun late night binges and the proper research methods and I challenge you to do the same. There is no reason why we can’t have fun while so producing sound research.

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